New HEAL Study: Effect of a Centrally-Procured School Snack Program Vs. a Traditional School Snack Program on Children’s Dietary Intake: A Randomized Controlled Trial

A team of researchers led by Jamie Seabrook with Kimberly Charbonneau, Louise McEachern, and Jason Gilliland recently published an article entitled: “Effect of a Centrally-Procured School Snack Program Vs. a Traditional School Snack Program on Children’s Dietary Intake: A Randomized Controlled Trial.”

Less than one-third of Canadian children consume the recommended five daily servings of FV. This cRCT aims to assess how a 10-week centrally-procured school food program (intervention) influences consumption of FV compared to a traditional program (control).

Sixty elementary schools took part, including 2,422 children. Dietary intake during the school day was assessed using a new tool: “Pupils Eating At School.”

There were no significant improvements in servings or instances of FV, but a small, statistically significant increase in consumption of milk and alternatives was found.

Future research should consider other strategies to nudge children toward trying FV at school.

Citation: Jamie Seabrook, Kimberly Charbonneau, Louise McEachern, and Jason Gilliland. “Effect of a Centrally-Procured School Snack Program Vs. a Traditional School Snack Program on Children’s Dietary Intake: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition (2024); https://doi.org/10.1080/19320248.2024.2345678.

Categories: Newsletter

Leave a Reply